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Barite  (Baryte)
Current inventory:  0 gems
 

Barite

  
Baryte is named from the Greek word baryos, meaning heavy or weight, due to its unusually high specific gravity for a non-metallic mineral.

Discovered in 1640;   IMA status: Valid (pre-IMA; Grandfathered)

 

Chemistry

 

 

Chemical Formula:

Ba(SO4)

 

Barium Sulfate

Molecular Weight:

233.39 gm

Composition:

Barium

58.84 %

Ba

65.70 %

BaO

 

Sulfur

13.74 %

S

34.30 %

SO3

 

Oxygen

27.42 %

O

 

 

 

 

100.00 %

 

100.00 %

= TOTAL OXIDE

 

 

Classification

   

   

Mineral Classification:

Sulfates

Strunz 8th Ed. ID:

6/A.09-20

Nickel-Strunz 10th Ed. ID:

7.AD.35

 

7 : SULFATES (selenates, tellurates, chromates, molybdates, wolframates)
A : Sulfates (selenates, etc.) without additional anions, without H
2O
D : With only large cations

Related to:

Barite Group. Baryte-Celestine Series. The barium analogue of Celestine.

Members of Group:

Barite Group: Anglesite, Barite, Celestine, Hashemite

Varieties:

Angleso-barite, Baryte Rose, Ca- and Sr-rich Baryte, Calcareobarite, Celestobarite (of Dana), Hokutolite, Meißelspat, Oakstone, Radian Barite, Schoharite, Strontian Barite, Strontian Baryte

Synonyms:

Astapia, Astrapia, Baritite, Baryte, Baroite, Baroselenite, Barote, Barytes, Barytine, Barytite, Bologna stone, Bolognian Spar, Bononian stone, Boulanite, Boulonite, Calk, Calstronbarite, Cauk, Cawk, Dreelite, Dréelite, Fetid Heavy Spar, Heavy Spar, Tiff, Volnye, Yellow Spar

 

 

Crystal Data

   

   

Crystallography:

Orthorhombic - Dipyramidal

Crystal Habit:

Commonly in well-formed crystals, to 85 cm, with over 70 forms noted. Thin to thick tabular; also prismatic, equant. As crested to rosettelike aggregates of tabular individuals, concretionary, fibrous, nodular, stalactitic, may be banded; granular, earthy, massive.

Twinning:

None

 

 

Physical Properties

   

 

Cleavage:

Perfect on {001}, less Perfect on {210}, Imperfect on {010}

Fracture:

Irregular/Uneven

Tenacity:

Brittle

Moh's Hardness:

3.0 - 3.5

Density:

4.48 - 4.50 (g/cm3) (very heavy for a non-metallic mineral)

Luminescence:

May fluoresce in shades of yellow or white (Franklin & Sterling Hill, NJ), occasionally orange or pink under LW UV and phosphoresce cream or strongly greenish-white to spectral colors under UV. May be thermoluminescent at times.

Radioactivity:

Not Radioactive

Other:

Slightly soluble in water, more so in solutions of salts or acids.
Diamagnetic.

 

 

Optical Properties

   

   

Color:

Colorless, White, Yellow, Brown, Gray, pale shades of Red, Green, Blue, may be zoned, or change color on exposure to light

Transparency:

Transparent to Translucent to Opaque

Luster:

Vitreous, Pearly

Refractive Index:

1.634 - 1.648  Biaxial ( + )

Birefringence:

0.0110 - 0.0120

Dispersion:

Weak; r > v

Pleochroism:

Weak; Color X Y Z
Brown: Straw-yellow Wine-yellow Violet
Yellow: Lt. yel.-brn. Yellow-brn Brown
Green: Nr colourless Lt. grn. Amethyst
Blue-grn: Blue-violet Bluish grn Violet

 

 

Occurances

   

   

Geological Setting:

Commonly found as a gangue mineral in metallic ore deposits of epithermal or mesothermal origin; but it may also be found as lenses or replacement deposits in sedimentary rocks, both of hypogene and supergene origin.

Common Associations:

Calcite, Dolomite, Fluorite, Galena, Magnatite, Pyrite, Quartz, Siderite

Common Impurities:

Sr, Ca, Pb

Type Locality:

n/a

Year Discovered:

1640

View mineral photos:

Barite Mineral Photos and Locations

 

 

More Information

   

   

 

Mindat.org
Webmineral.com

 

 


Barite (also spelled Baryte) is a fairly common mineral but somewhat rare as a gemstone because clean, facet grade crystals are difficult to find. Barite (BaSO4) is the most common barium mineral and is the barium analog of Celestine (Celestite) (SrSO4). Celestine contains strontium (Sr) in place of Barite's barium (Ba). Both have the same structure and can form very similar crystals. Barite is a member of the Barite mineral group that also includes Anglesite and Celestine. Barite crystals are usually found as opaque masses or opaque bladed crystals. Transparent crystal specimens can be found in some locations. One example are the blue crystals found at Stoneham, Weld County, Colorado, USA.

Some notable sources of facetable crystals are Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada (colorless); Rock Candy Mine, British Columbia, Canada (yellow); Cumberland, England; and in the USA from Meade County, South Dakota (brown); the Book Cliffs, near Grand Junction, Colorado (colorless); and Stoneham, Weld County, Colorado (blue). There are many other locations for Barite.
 

  
Barite gems for sale:

Barite-001

Gem:

Barite

Stock #:

BAR-001

Weight:

0.8240 ct

Size:

5.19 x 4.15 x 3.52 mm

Shape:

Cut Corner Rectangle, Radiant

Color:

Blue

Clarity:

Eye Clean

Origin:

Stoneham, Colorado, USA

Treatment:

None (natural)

Price:

SOLD (but we have others)

Pictures are of the actual gem offered for sale.
Gem images are magnified to show detail.

Barite-001

A very rare gem from a classic Barite location; Stoneham, Weld County, Colorado, USA. Probably the best known location in the world for blue Barite. This beautiful gem was precision faceted in the US and is eye clean and very bright. It was very difficult to capture the beautiful, almost baby blue color in this wonderful gem.


Barite-002

Gem:

Barite

Stock #:

BAR-002

Weight:

0.8650 ct

Size:

7.54 x 4.22 x 1.99 mm

Shape:

Cut Corner Rectangle, Step

Color:

Pale Blue

Clarity:

Eye Clean - I2

Origin:

Stoneham, Colorado, USA

Treatment:

None (natural)

Price:

SOLD (but we have others)

Pictures are of the actual gem offered for sale.
Gem images are magnified to show detail.

Barite-002

A very rare gem from a classic Barite location; Stoneham, Weld County, Colorado, USA. Probably the best known location in the world for blue Barite. This gem has some inclusions but still a very nice gem from a very collectable Barite location.


 


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